Pedagogy Resources

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Table of ContentsGlossary

Student Engagement

Building opportunities for students to engage and find academic success

What is It?

Student engagement happens in the present tense. It is when students are motivated to work on/with the material in your course. Engagement has impacts (future tense) as well as causes (past tense) that include but are not exclusive to your course or even students’ academic careers. For example, engaged students tend to do better academically across all courses and in future careers. Meanwhile, factors that facilitate student engagement are structural, psychosocial, and sociocultural. In other words, there is more to student engagement than instructors building engaging courses. But students who find engagement in your course can see that motivation ripple across multiple courses, and continue on to have lasting impacts on their careers and lives.

Kahu, E.R (2013). Framing student engagement in higher education. Studies in Higher Education, 38 (5), 758-773.

Kahu, E.R. (2013). Framing student engagement in higher education. Studies in Higher Education, 38 (5), 758-773.

How Can I Use Student Engagement in My Course?

“It is widely recognized that engagement breeds engagement,” writes Ella Kahu, who studies student engagement in higher education. Facilitating engagement in your course can breed engagement in other courses, in future academic pursuits, and beyond. You have the opportunity to make an enormous impact by connecting with students, and helping them to connect to your course. How do you do that? With people — connect with your students and help them connect with one another.

Student-Teacher Connections

Be visible and easy to reach in your course

    1. Post videos to give students a sense that they are seeing you regularly
    2. Use multiple modes of communication: announcements, email, chat, virtual office hours and video conferencing.  
    3. Be responsive. Let students know when you’re available and how long they can expect to wait when they try to get in touch. 
    4. Feedback: Instructor feedback on student work is, in many courses, the primary way instructors communicate with individual students. Your feedback can initiate conversations and start a process with a student of finding their strengths and connections to the course. Consider using a personal rather than formal tone in written comments. Try using video and voice to give feedback.

Student-Student Connections

Help students connect with one another

      1. Your first thought — and dread — may be groupwork. Prepare students for success in groupwork by keeping the stakes on the assignment low and explicitly making “collaboration with peers” one of your objectives. Try pairs and small groups first, experiment with letting students propose project topics first, and let the students form their own groups based on interest in each other’s project ideas. Encourage interaction with group meetings, video calls, and a robust chat and collaboration space.
      2. Make it easy for students to contact each other directly. Initiate the practice by using chat tools informally and/or use a tool, like Slack, that makes direct-messaging easy.
      3. Make discussion and peer review central in your course. Model good, responsive discussion practices for students and experiment with the tools available — try emoji responses! Google docs + folders are great tools for peer review. Slack, WordPress, and social media (including Facebook, Twitter) are great for discussion.

    Student-Self Connections:

    Help students connect to who they are, their interests and motivations

    1. Listen to students, ask questions, check in regularly, adjust your plans based on what you learn. A mid-course survey using a tool like Google docs can help with this.
    2. Allow for choice in assignments — in topic and/or form. Are your students doing presentations? Instead of slides, encourage them to try Thinglink, Prezi, Explain Everything, video, and more.
    3. Invite students to connect with the material, with you and peers with personal stories. What do they bring to this material?
    4. Help students see the connection between what you do in the classroom and what they do — and could do — outside the classroom. How does what we do in here matter out there?

Technologies

Any tool that helps support communication in your course will also support engagement, if used well:

Questions and Considerations

Academic writing about student engagement discusses both instrumental and intrinsic engagement, often favoring intrinsic. Instrumental engagement largely involves rewarding the behaviors that the teacher is seeking. This is how traditional Western education has worked for a long time — grades, discipline, certificates, diplomas, gold stars on the class chart (not all intended primarily or solely as engagement mechanisms). For those for whom this instrumental approach works, it can still elicit many of the positive connections and impacts listed above. On the other hand, it’s been argued that intrinsic motivation encourages “substantive and sustained engagement.” Intrinsic motivation is about students finding their path into what your course is working on and engaging in it largely out of interest. This sort of engagement is facilitated by offering choice and building openness into a course.

Research Foundations

Athanassiou, N., McNett, J. M., & Harvey, C. (2003). Critical thinking in the management classroom: Bloom’s taxonomy as a learning toolJournal of Management Education27 (5), 533-555.

Cercone, K. (2008). Characteristics of Adult Learners with Implications for Online Learning Design. AACE Journal, 16(2), 137-159.

Dixon, M.D. (2010) Creating effective student engagement in online courses: What do students find engaging? Journal of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, 10(2), 1 – 13.

Kahu, E.R. (2013). Framing student engagement in higher education. Studies in Higher Education, 38(5), 758-773.

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UAF Instructional Designers

This page has been authored collectively by the experts on the UAF Instructional Design Team. Let us know if you have suggestions or corrections!

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Instructional Design Team, UAF eLearning