Teaching a course? Take a course!

One of the most common questions we receive from faculty in UAF eCampus iTeach workshops is
“what does an online course look like”? We all have years – and in some cases decades – of practice forming expectations of face-to-face learning experiences, but for those who are new to teaching online, it is often difficult to imagine how it all works. Learning experiences are complicated. Even if you’re a veteran online instructor, it can be helpful to take a look at what others are doing in their online courses. No matter where you’re at, touring a few courses can be a very important step toward building your fluency with the medium of online instruction.

Manage tasks, not time

Whether you’re designing an all new course or revising and preparing an existing course for a new semester, it’s a lot of work. And work equals time, right? Yes, but that we’re not all necessarily organizing our to-do lists in the most useful way.

Online education – part 2

Last week we discussed the gold standard of online learning experience design: Your course is complete prior to students ever sitting in their virtual seats. Your intended outcomes are firmly in your sights and you can now devote time during the semester to feedback, assessment, and mentoring. Your solid design and your consistent presence work together to achieve everyone’s educational dreams.

Online education part – 1

One of the most common questions I hear is, “how much time is it going to take to develop my online course?” This question reminds me of similar questions such as, “How long does it take to build a house?” and “How long does it take to make dinner?” The answers to these, of course, are, “it depends.”